Saturday, July 20, 2024
From the Wire

Spotted Lanternflies Innocent???

New research suggests that the invasive spotted lanternfly, often seen as a public nuisance, may cause little long-term damage to various types of trees. The four-year study conducted by researchers at Penn State University found that while heavily infested trees initially suffered impaired growth and reduced ability to photosynthesize, many of them began to recover by year three as the lanternfly population declined. The only species that continued to show a lack of growth was the tree of heaven, which is known to be the bugs’ preferred tree. While the study’s findings should be corroborated by further research, it offers hope that the general public may have less to fear from these insects in their backyards.

Spotted Lanternflies Innocent???

Spotted Lanternflies Innocent???

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Introduction

In recent years, the spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula) has become one of the most dreaded pests in the Eastern U.S., primarily due to its voracious appetite and invasive nature. However, new research conducted by Penn State University suggests that these insects might be less harmful to tree species than previously believed. While the study acknowledges the need for careful management of spotted lanternflies, it also indicates that the general public may have less reason to fear them in their backyard.

Background Information

Originally native to China, the spotted lanternfly made its way to the U.S. in 2014 and has since spread to over a dozen states across the Eastern U.S. These bugs are notorious for feeding on the sap of various fruit, ornamental, and woody trees, which can potentially have long-lasting effects on the trees’ health. Moreover, the lanternflies leave behind a sugary waste product called honeydew, which can attract other pests and promote the growth of harmful fungi. With no natural predators in the U.S., the lanternfly population has the potential to spiral out of control.

Spotted Lanternflies Innocent???

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Negative Impacts of Spotted Lanternflies

The rapid rise of spotted lanternflies has led to widespread public concern and has prompted scientists and environmental agencies to encourage residents to eliminate them on sight. However, the long-term environmental impact of these insects remains largely unknown. While it is clear that heavily infested trees initially suffer from reduced growth and impaired photosynthesis, the full extent of the damage caused remains uncertain.

The Need for Further Research

To better understand the potential risks posed by spotted lanternflies, researchers at Penn State University conducted a four-year-long study. The objective was to observe the impact of these insects on four different tree species: silver maple, willow, river birch, and tree of heaven. The study also included uninfested control groups to compare the findings.

Spotted Lanternflies Innocent???

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The Study Conducted by Penn State University

As expected, the study found that the heavily infested trees fared worse than the control groups and lightly infested trees in the early stages. The roots of these trees showed reduced growth and impaired ability to photosynthesize. However, by the third year of the study, many of the trees began to recover as the lanternfly population declined. Only the tree of heaven, which is known to be the preferred tree of the bugs, continuously showed a lack of growth. Despite this, even the tree of heaven, as an invasive species itself, did not die off.

The researchers intentionally designed the study to represent a worst-case scenario, which suggests that the actual damage caused by spotted lanternflies in the real world may be even less severe.

Results of the Study

The findings of the study, published in the journal Environmental Entomology, indicate that the spotted lanternfly is not as dangerous to hardwood trees, apart from the tree of heaven, as previously feared. The nymphs and adults of these insects frequently move, making the degree of reduced growth observed in the study unlikely unless the insects remain on the trees for extended periods. This research suggests that the lasting damage caused by spotted lanternflies on trees may be minimal.

It is essential to note that this study represents only one piece of the puzzle, and it would be ideal to have other scientists validate these conclusions. Other evidence suggests that the most significant harm caused by spotted lanternflies in the U.S. is primarily to important agricultural crops, particularly grapes, which have experienced massive production losses since the arrival of the pests.

Spotted Lanternflies Innocent???

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Implications of the Study

While the study from Penn State University challenges the perception of spotted lanternflies as a significant threat to tree species, it does not completely dismiss the need for caution. The researchers emphasize that the bugs can still pose a risk to trees used for timber and that timber industries should remain vigilant when moving wood out of quarantine zones. Production nurseries should also manage spotted lanternflies on potential hardwood host trees to prevent any reductions in growth or tree health.

However, the study’s author, Kelli Hoover, suggests that the general public should not panic if they spot lanternflies on trees in their yards. The chances of lasting damage occurring are low. Kelli Hoover advises against using insecticides on trees unless egg masses are present, in which case removing them and disposing of them properly is recommended.

Other Potential Risks Posed by Spotted Lanternflies

Although the study focuses primarily on the impact of spotted lanternflies on trees, it is essential to consider potential risks beyond tree health. These insects can have broader ecological and economic consequences. For instance, the lanternflies’ ability to feed on various crops, such as grapes, can lead to significant production losses and threaten agricultural livelihoods. Additionally, the presence of lanternflies can disrupt ecosystems by attracting other pests and promoting the growth of harmful fungi.

Spotted Lanternflies Innocent???

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Management Strategies for Spotted Lanternflies

Given the potential risks associated with spotted lanternflies, effective management strategies are crucial. Currently, scientists and environmental agencies advise residents to eliminate lanternflies on sight. However, the study’s findings suggest that stomping on the insects may not significantly reduce their populations. Continued vigilance and the monitoring of wood transportation by industries, such as the timber industry, will be necessary to prevent the spread of these pests. Additionally, production nurseries should actively manage spotted lanternflies on potential hardwood host trees to ensure optimal growth and tree health.

Conclusion

While the study conducted by Penn State University challenges the perception of spotted lanternflies as a severe threat to tree species, it is important to remain cautious. The research suggests that these insects may cause less lasting damage to hardwood trees, apart from the tree of heaven, than previously believed. However, the economic and ecological risks posed by spotted lanternflies, particularly to agricultural crops, cannot be ignored. Effective management strategies should continue to be implemented, and further research is needed to fully understand the true impact of these pests.

Source: https://gizmodo.com/study-spotted-lanterflies-may-not-be-so-bad-1850858364